Insurance

What is a Deductible?

Deductible

[dih-duhk-tuh-buh l]

noun

1.

A Deductible is the amount of money a policyholder must pay out of pocket before any insurance payments are made. For example, if repairs to a personal vehicle cost $1,000, but the Deductible on that Policy is $500, the policyholder must pay $500 toward the repairs before the insurance company covers the other $500.

Share |

Have A Question About This Topic?

Thank you! Oops!

Related Content

Valuing Your Work as a Stay-at-Home Parent

Valuing Your Work as a Stay-at-Home Parent

It's important to insure the life of a stay-at-home parent to protect the value they bring to the family.

How to Make Charitable Giving a Lifelong Pursuit

How to Make Charitable Giving a Lifelong Pursuit

Charitable donations are good for the recipient, and increasingly, research shows that they are good for the giver, too.

The 5 Roles Life Insurance Can Play in Retirement

The 5 Roles Life Insurance Can Play in Retirement

A life insurance policy can supplement your retirement financial strategy by being a source of emergency cash or loan funds, or by simply providing the confidence that comes from knowing you've covered all the bases.